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city cycling committee against the Dundas Velodrome site

The Hamilton Cycling Committee, a council appointed committee, has this to say about the "Preferred Location for Velodrome" (from July committee minutes) - (which supports what Restore Cootes believes to be best for Cootes, and the city - no velodrome in Dundas in a Environmentally Sensitive Area, and no new taxes to pay for this)

- Support West Harbour location as well as other downtown locations

- Within urban envelope and in vicinity of downtown in order to ensure accessibility to all Hamiltonians

- Limits for consideration would be McMaster (westerly), Ivor Wynne stadium area easterly, water to the north, escarpment to the south (keep it in the lower city)

- The above limits have the best transit service in the whole of the city - which is important. 
- Accessibility to highways is important and the downtown is accessible from the highway (there are many ways to get downtown

– there is a misconception that the downtown is not as easily accessed as locations off the new Lincoln Alexander Parkway)

- Schools should be able to take advantage

- Community orientation is important

- A location on the urban fringe will alienate/limit access for poorer people

- There is a psychological barrier for some Hamiltonians who believe the West Harbour area is unsafe; however there is gentrification and a revival occurring in the area and perception is shifting. With time, the group believes this conception will change

- The proposed West Harbour site is the last area in this part of town that is still derelict– the project could help change the West Harbour area for the better if located there

- West Harbour is connected to trails, which is a benefit- West Harbour also provides excellent access to Niagara and Burlington and is near the proposed new GO Station (James St.)

- Proximity to McMaster (but not directly on the campus) would be a good thing - on campus could be a barrier to the broader community

- Ivor Wynne is also a great location which is City owned

- King St. nearby is a preferred route for the new LRT

- Consider other properties along Hwy 403

- in vicinity of King St, Main St or Aberdeen (Kay Drage, etc.)

- A vacant city block downtown, such as the parking lot at Main & Bay would also be a suitable site


Co-Location of the Velodrome with the Stadium and Outdoor Track: (Good & Bad)

- Possible savings from co-location in that it would be possible to share facilities (a hub)

- Synergies from locating in same precinct – e.g. Copps Coliseum, etc. all in same area B Concern that if all three components are built together, the larger facility (football) and its crowds would take over

- Parking and traffic concerns with co-location

- Concern that there would be competition for parking and public transit if events are held at the same time

- Difficulty with three organizations on a single site who will have differing and sometimes conflicting interests, goals, roles – potential for conflict and for the larger facility to win out

- How the velodrome roof will be constructed (material or hard roof) makes a difference to the co-location question; if made of material, increased concerns about noise, vibration from adjacent venues

- Opportunities to fill gaps in athletic programs (e.g. lack of soccer fields)



[See the minutes from the HCC for the rest of the discussion]

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