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Boxing Day bird count in Coldspring Valley

Thanks to this annual Hamilton Naturalist Club event, the Boxing day bird count had our friend Rob Porter counting birds in Coldspring Valley. In a few hours he spotted 28 species! Rob thoughtfully provided us with his count of each species. Any one want to comment on what the types of species he spotted means with regards to the habitat available? Or what adding a marsh instead of a parking lot would be likely to do?

Thanks Rob!
  • 29 Canada Goose
  • 1 Cooper's Hawk
  • 4 Red-tailed Hawk - Three seen at same time, all stirred up when the Cooper's Hawk arrived.
  • 17 Ring-billed Gull
  • 1 Herring Gull
  • 1 Mourning Dove
  • 6 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 14 Downy Woodpecker
  • 3 Hairy Woodpecker
  • 14 Blue Jay
  • 3 American Crow
  • 45 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • 14 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 Brown Creeper
  • 7 Carolina Wren Map of locations found: https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=zeVs6ZI4aFZw.kM03gY0lBwgk - While this may seem high, they are quite spread out along the perimeter of the property, which is largely surrounded with edge habitat.
  • 2 Northern Mockingbird
  • 1 European Starling
  • 2 Cedar Waxwing
  • 16 American Tree Sparrow
  • 1 Song Sparrow
  • 7 White-throated Sparrow
  • 29 Dark-eyed Junco
  • 19 Northern Cardinal
  • 14 House Finch
  • 11 Pine Siskin - Photographed. Found feeding on alder cones near the helipad.
  • 19 American Goldfinch
  • 22 House Sparrow

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